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Author Archives: Rachel Koning Beals

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Koning Beals is a contributing editor to JLN Environmental/Energy.

JLN Environmental/Energy: Global carbon market to reach record volumes by 2016; EU manufacturers resume fight for carbon market shake-up; Warming Pause Doesn’t Reverse Scientific View on Climate Standard

A note of thanksIt is not often that you find someone who can do whatever you ask them to do, do it well and consistently for years. Such has been the case for Rachel Koning Beals, who has managed this newsletter since 2008. She is a journalist in the ideal sense, one who is able to move into a new topic such as environmental markets, learn it, understand it and then master it. So it is with great regret that Rachel is moving on to other pursuits and looking to spend more time with the only thing more important in…

JLN Environmental/Energy: No Conflict of Interest Found in Favorable Review of Keystone Pipeline; Dream of U.S. Oil Independence Slams Against Shale Costs;EU backloading passes into law Standard

In 2014, the value of the globally-traded carbon market will rise by two thirds from 2013 reach 64bn euro, (39bn euro in 2013), with volume increasing by 3 percent to 9.6 Gt CO2e, according to analysis by Thomson Reuters Point Carbon. These figures, featured in our Leads section, serve as interesting background to the official passage today of a EU carbon market plan to prop up carbon prices. The EU enacted into law the so-called backloading measure that keeps on track the European Commission’s aim to allow the withdrawal of a maximum 400 million permits this year. Quote of the…

JLN Environmental/Energy: EU backs tougher car emissions limits; Another $329.7 million spent on California carbon permits; U.S. government looks for ways to boost energy infrastructure Standard

In this edition, coverage of European lawmakers’ decision to back the world’s toughest carbon emission targets for cars. Auto producers will have to cut 27% of their vehicles’ carbon-dioxide emissions by 2021.Germany, on behalf of its luxury car makers, such as Daimler and BMW, campaigned hard for more time to implement the legislation, which its car industry says will still be extremely challenging, Reuters reports. Environmental groups largely supported the move but were critical of its weakened terms from earlier drafts. Quote of the Day: “Many large metropolitan areas, in the United States and elsewhere, are attempting to rise to…

JLN Environmental/Energy: Justices Divided on EPA Greenhouse-Gas Case; Hunt moves to scrap carbon auctions; GE to spend $10bn on gas technologies Standard

In this edition, Australia’s Clean Energy Regulator has supported the scrapping of planned carbon permit auctions, saying market interest in the permits would likely be weak as the federal government seeks to repeal the carbon price, The Daily Telegraph reports. The Greens will seek to block the Abbott government’s move. Plus, in the U.S., an Obama -administration effort to cut greenhouse-gas emissions faced an uncertain fate at the Supreme Court on Monday, with justices sharply divided over industry claims that the government is going too far in applying the Clean Air Act. Quote of the Day: “[The EPA doesn’t want…

JLN Environmental/Energy: Supreme Court weighs EPA authority to regulate greenhouse gases; Shell hits out at Brussels energy policy; Aircraft face fines as deadline looms for EU pollution penalties Standard

In this edition, a focus on decision-making in Washington and climate’s role in the mid-terms. It starts with: Supreme Court weighs EPA authority to regulate greenhouse gases. The program in question is the Environmental Protection Agency’s permitting process for coal-fired power plants, chemical facilities and oil refineries. Also, the transcript from weekend TV: President Obama is pressing ahead with his climate-change agenda. What is the Obama administration trying to do, and will he get help from a hedge-fund billionaire? The Washington Post reports: Environmental advocates target climate change as Democratic election issue. And, two Democratic lawmakers are defending Secretary of…

JLN Environmental/Energy: Nebraska ruling could grant Obama breathing space on Keystone; Australia prepares reverse auction approach to replace carbon tax; The Coal Plant an Illinois Town Couldn’t Give Away Standard

In this edition, reports from Australia indicate a global cap-and-trade link could be one step closer. Carbon tax-focused Australia may become the first developed nation to test the idea that a link with the European Emissions Trading System would lead to a functioning global cap-and-trade CO2 market. Meanwhile, the U.K. faces an embarrassing fine as the European Commission threatens to file a lawsuit for failing to meet air pollution limits on nitrogen dioxide. It’s against that backdrop that U.K. Chancellor George Osborne makes headlines, urging a move past the “ideological” opposition to nuclear power and shale gas. As for U.S….

JLN Environmental/Energy: Keystone pipeline approval in limbo after Nebraska ruling; Climate billionaire aims to set stage for 2016; States in the middle as utilities, solar advocates clash Standard

Environmental Financial Products introduces the book “Environmental Markets: A New Asset Class”, authored by Richard L. Sandor, Nathan Clark, Murali Kanakasabai and Rafael L. Marques. The book, commissioned by the CFA Institute Research Foundation, was created as a research and teaching tool and is available free to the public online. Amory Lovins, founder of the Rocky Mountain Institute and a world-renowned scientist, environmentalist and sustainability expert, offers the forward to this look at a relatively new asset class that offers a chance to “do well and to do good.” The book is born out of economic theory and practical experience,…

JLN Environmental/Energy: Qingdao city next in line to set up emissions market in China;Australia climate plan needs strong rules to boost bite-report; How business can take action on the California water crisis Standard

In this edition, a feature in The Economist argues that policy has yet to catch up with the economic benefits of shale. Defenders of the ban (including, naturally, some refiners) claim that if America exported more oil, Saudi Arabia would reduce its own output. Prices to American consumers would not fall, they say, and might even rise. Historical evidence says otherwise, however, the article argues, pointing out that when Congress allowed Alaska to export crude oil in 1995, its west-coast customers did not pay any more for petrol, diesel or jet fuel. And, from The Wall Street Journal, China and…

JLN Environmental/Energy: EU Leaders Said to Delay Decision on 2030 Carbon Target; White House pledges $1 billion to prepare for climate change; Australia to review renewable energy target Standard

Hey developed world: Iran plans carbon emissions trading market, official tells Reuters. Details lacking, for now. Meanwhile, EU leaders reportedly to delay decision on 2030 carbon target. Most governments in the 28-nation bloc need more time to reconcile differences over a proposal by the EU’s regulatory arm calling for tighter emissions restrictions and an overhaul of renewable energy policies by 2030, Bloomberg reports. Quote of the Day: “It’s very important that EU leaders set a time horizon in March for endorsement of the commission’s proposal — that’s a signal that Europe must send globally. Hopefully that will be June. Otherwise…