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Environmental Energy: Why an E.U. without Britain is bad news for the fight against climate change; Solar Power to Grow Sixfold as Sun Becoming Cheapest Resource; China Signals Coal-Capacity Cut Equal to 7.5% of Output in 2015.

Summary

In today’s edition, learn why an E.U. without Britain is bad news for the fight against climate change, and also, how solar power is to grow sixfold as sun is becoming the cheapest resource. Finally, in the Natural gas / coal section, learn  why China says it’s reining in coal production (the country tries to curb the pollution choking the nation’s cities and eliminate so-called “zombie” companies in the struggling industry.) 

Quote of the day

“The UK has generally argued for stronger action on emissions within the EU, so its absence will make it more difficult to counter the arguments of those Member States, such as Poland, which want slower and weaker cuts in emissions.” 

Bob Ward, policy and communications director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science, in the Washington Post’s story Why an E.U. without Britain is bad news for the fight against climate change 

Lead stories 

Solar Power to Grow Sixfold as Sun Becoming Cheapest Resource 
By Mahmoud Habboush – Bloomberg News  
The amount of electricity generated using solar panels stands to expand as much as sixfold by 2030 as the cost of production falls below competing natural gas and coal-fired plants, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency. 
http://bloom.bg/28Uhjej  

Why an E.U. without Britain is bad news for the fight against climate change 
By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post 
It’s not just the upheaval in global financial markets.
Now that Britain has voted to leave the European Union, there may also be negative consequences for international climate change policy, a number of climate change advocates and analysts say. 
http://wapo.st/28ZZz6y 

Berlin’s Parliament Has Voted To Divest From Fossil Fuels 
By James Ayre – Clean Technica 
More specifically, the Berlin parliament voted to blacklist investment into companies that are incompatible with the city’s stated goal of going “climate neutral” by the year 2050. 
http://bit.ly/28Wff8O

Carbon 

The World Is Nearing Peak Fossil Fuels (Especially The Developed World) 
By Ben Schiller – co.Exist  
Worldwide use of fossil fuels will peak in 2025. Solar will be the least expensive form of electricity by 2030.
http://bit.ly/291yTD5 
***LB: Also in this story “And, by 2040, zero-emission forms of power will represent 60% of the global mix. These are some of the predictions of a new report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, which looks at long-term trends in the energy market.”

Natural gas / coal 

Natural Gas Prices Need More Heat To Sizzle  
By Robert Boslego – Seeking Alpha  
Cooling degree days caused more short covering, pushing prices higher. 
But speculators added long positions after the big price rise. 
http://bit.ly/28VHfv1

China Signals Coal-Capacity Cut Equal to 7.5% of Output in 2015 
Bloomberg News  
China says it’s reining in coal production as the country tries to curb the pollution choking the nation’s cities and eliminate so-called “zombie” companies in the struggling industry. 
http://bloom.bg/2901c4l 

Power 

What we can learn about clean energy from our Pacific neighbors 
By Heather Clancy – Greenbiz 
Hawaii’s bold bid to move entirely to renewable energy by 2045 seems even bolder when you consider that many of the strategies being embraced by the U.S. mainland won’t necessarily work that well for the 136-island state. (Yes, there are that many, although only eight of them are inhabited.) 
http://bit.ly/28WkByi

Clean tech

Tesla wants to be your renewable energy everything  
By Heather Smith – Grist 
Elon Musk — future Mars settler, founder of Tesla – stepped into the solar business earlier this week with Tesla Motor’s $2.5 billion bid to buy SolarCity, the top home solar company in America. 
http://bit.ly/28UhlmD   

Water 

Expanded Panama Canal: Bigger ships, bigger paydays for beans, coal, gas 
By Keith Wallis  – Reuters 
Bigger ships could mean bigger paydays for commodity producers when the expanded Panama Canal opens this weekend as they can utilize larger vessels more frequently to tap into fast growing Asia-Pacific consumer markets. 
http://reut.rs/28YMd9X

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